American Philosophers, 1637-1920

Significant American Professors of Philosophy,
Natural Philosophy, and Theology from 1637 to 1920 

by
John Shook, PhD

This website organizes professors of philosophy and other contributors to philosophical thought according to the college where they taught. Many of the colleges listed here (and most of the colleges not listed here) assigned the teaching of philosophy to their college presidents or professors of denominational theology until the early 1900s.

For a chronological organization of these and many more American professors and intellectuals, see A Timeline of American Thought. See also the Dictionary of Early American Philosophers and the Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers. Why not also visit the Pragmatism Cybrary?

American colleges founded between 1776 and 1835

Transylvania University (1780)

Washington and Lee University (1782)

Washington College (Md.) (1782)

Dickinson College (1783)

St. John's College (1784)

University of Georgia (1785)

Western University of Pennsylvania (now University of Pittsburgh) (1787)

Franklin College (1787, merged with Marshall College in 1850 to form Franklin
and Marshall College)

Washington and Jefferson College (1787)

Georgetown University (1789)

University of North Carolina (1789)

University of Vermont (1791)

Williams College (1793)

Bowdoin College (1794)

University of Tennessee (1794)

Union College (NY) (1795)

Middlebury College (1800)

Jefferson College (1801)

South Carolina College (1801, now University of South Carolina)

Washington College (Penn.) (1802)

Ohio University (1804)

Moravian College (1807)

Miami University (1809)

Hamilton College (1812)

Colby College (1813)

Allegheny College (1815)

University of Virginia (1816)

University of Alabama (1820)

Indiana University (1820)

Amherst College (1821)

University of the City of New York (1831, now New York University)

Wesleyan University (1831)

Oberlin College (1833)

University of Delaware (1833)

Wake Forest University (1834)

American colleges founded between 1835 and 1865

Emory University (1838)

University of Missouri (1839)

University of Michigan (1841)

University of Buffalo (1846, now SUNY at Buffalo)

University of Iowa (1847)

University of Mississippi (1848)

University of Wisconsin (1848)

University of Minnesota (1851)

University of Florida (1853)

Michigan State University (1855)

Pennsylvania State University (1855)

Auburn University (1856)

Iowa State University (1856)

University of Maryland (1856)

Wilberforce University (1856)

Louisiana State University (1859)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1861)

Kansas State University (1863)

University of Massachusetts (1863)

American colleges founded between 1865 and 1900

Atlanta University (1865, merged with Clark College (1869) to form Clark Atlanta University)

Cornell University (1865)

University of Kentucky (1865)

University of Maine (1865)

Fisk University (1866)

University of New Hampshire (1866)

Alabama State University (1867)

Howard University (1867)

University of Illinois (1867)

Morgan State University (1867)

West Virginia University (1867)

University of California (1868)

Oregon State University (1868)

Boston University (1869)

University of Nebraska (1869)

Purdue University (1869)

Colorado State University (1870)

Ohio State University (1870)

Alcorn State University (1871)

University of Arkansas (1871)

Texas A&M University (1871)

Vanderbilt University (1873)

University of Colorado (1876)

Johns Hopkins University (1876)

University of Oregon (1876)

Mississippi State University (1878)

Southern University (1880)

University of Connecticut (1881)

Tuskegee University (1881)

University of Texas (1883)

Kentucky State University (1886)

University of Wyoming (1886)

Florida A&M University (1887)

North Carolina State University (1887)

Utah State University (1888)

Clemson University (1889)

Oklahoma State University (1890)

University of Oklahoma (1890)

University of Rhode Island (1892)

 Presidents and Significant Faculty of Philosophy and Theology from 1637 to 1920

 

American colleges founded during the Colonial period (1600-1775)

 Harvard University (1636)

College of William and Mary (1693)

Yale University (1701)

College of New Jersey (1746, now Princeton)

King's College (1754, now Columbia University)

College of Philadelphia (1755, now University of Pennsylvania)

College of Rhode Island (1765, now Brown University)

Dartmouth College (1769)

Queen's College (1771, now Rutgers University)

Hampden-Sydney College (1775)

 

 

Harvard University

President

Term

Other Faculty during Term 

Nathaniel Eaton (1609-1674)

1637-1639

Founded in 1636. The President taught all classes.

Henry Dunster (1609-1659)

1640-1654

Some graduates were retained as Tutors, who could teach most of the curriculum along with the President, who focused on theology. Older tutors were sometimes called Fellows, as the two terms were often used interchangeably, and most Fellows also held a position on the Harvard Corporation. The 1750 Charter provides for a President, a Treasurer, and five Fellows. The most significant are here listed simply as ëTutorsí, indicating that they had instruction responsibilities.

 

Samuel Mather (1626-1671)

Tutor (1646-1650). Son of Richard Mather. Going to England in 1650, he was an Oxford chaplain and then a Fellow at Trinity in Dublin, where he ministered for many years.

Jonathan Mitchell (1624-1668) Tutor (1647-1650). Succeeded Thomas Shepard Sr. to the pulpit of Cambridge Church in 1650.

Urian Oakes (c1631-1681) Tutor (1650 to 1653, 1672-1673).

Michael Wigglesworth (1631-1705) Tutor (1652-1654). Later famous for his poetry and jeremiad sermons. Son Edward became first Hollis Professor of Divinity.

Charles Chauncy (1592-1672)

1654-1672

In 1654 the numbers of years required for the BA degree increases from three to four years.

Samuel Bradstreet (c1633-1682)

Tutor (1656-1657). Son of Anne Bradstreet.

Zechariah Symmes (1638-1708)

Tutor (1657-1663)

Joseph Browne (c1646-1678)

Tutor (1667-1673)

John Richardson (1647-1696)

Tutor (1667-1673)

Leonard Hoar (c1630-1675)

1672-1675

Urian Oakes (c1631-1681) Tutor (1650-1653, 1672-1673). Became President of Harvard.

Joseph Browne (c1646-1678)

Tutor (c1667-1673)

John Richardson (1647-1696)

Tutor (c1667-1673)

Thomas Shepard (1635-1677)

Tutor (1672-1673, 1675-1677)

In 1673 the four tutors resigned their posts, and many students dropped out, precipitating the resignation of Hoar.

Urian Oakes (c1631-1681)

1675-1681

Thomas Shepard (1635-1677)

Tutor (1672-1673, 1675-1677)

Samuel Mitchell (1660-c1690)

Tutor (1678-1685)

Samuel Andrew (1656-1738)

Tutor (1679-1784)

John Rogers (1631-1684)

1682-1684

Samuel Mitchell (1660-c1690)

Tutor (1678-1685)

Samuel Andrew (1656-1738)

Tutor (1679-1784)

John Cotton (1658-1710)

Tutor (1681-1686). Grandson of both Puritan John Cotton and Governor Simon Bradstreet.

Increase Mather (1639-1723). Mather lived in Boston and traveled widely; he gave few lectures at Harvard.

1685-1701

John Leverett (1662-1724) Tutor (1685-1696). Wrote Compendium Logicae Verum (1692). Later was Acting President.

William Brattle (1662-1717) Tutor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1686-1696). He also taught theology and divinity from 1696-1717 as minister of the local Cambridge church. His Compendium of Logick made Cartesian logic dominant at Harvard from 1687 to the 1760s, when new tutors preferred Isaac Wattsís Logick.

Charles Morton (c1627-1698) Vice President and occasional lecturer on experimental science, logic, and psychology (1687-1698). His Compendium Physicae and Logick System, written during his academy years in England, were copied and recopied in manuscript by Harvard students for use as textbooks from 1687 until about 1728. Called Americaís First philosopher. Also served as Fellow.

John Leverett (1662-1724) and William Brattle (1662-1717) [acting Presidents for Mather]

1688-1692

Brattle and Leverett were the faculty and on-site administration of the college from 1685 to 1696, and Brattle informally led the college until 1707.

Samuel Willard (1640-1707) [as Vice-President, never officially became President]

1701-1707

William Brattle (1662-1717) Informal professor of divinity (1696-1717) as minister of the local Cambridge church. Brattle also was the on-site official at Harvard during much of Willardís administration.

Henry Flynt (1676-1760) Tutor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1699-1760)  In 1699, after failing to secure a pulpit, he was appointed tutor at Harvard, a post previously held by recent graduates for a few years until securing a pastorate. Flynt was the first of the college's career tutors. He began with freshmen and moved up with them until graduation, teaching every subject (except divinity) in the curriculum, namely, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, logic, rhetoric, physics, ethics, metaphysics, geography, arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy. In later years as other faculty were added, his duties concentrated on math, logic, ethics, and metaphysics. He used William Brattleís Compendium of Logick.

Thomas Brattle (1658-1713) Gave informal instruction in mathematics and astronomy (1689-1713). Also served as Treasurer. Teacher of Thomas Robie.

John Leverett (1662-1724)

1708-1724

Henry Flynt (1676-1760) Tutor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1699-1760)

Thomas Brattle (1658-1713) Gave informal instruction in mathematics and astronomy (c1695-1713). Also served as Treasurer. Teacher of Thomas Robie.

Thomas Robie (1689-1729) Tutor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1713-1729). Robie probably introduced calculus in 1719. Teacher of Isaac Greenwood.

Edward Wigglesworth, Sr. (1693-1765) First Hollis Professor of Divinity (1722-1765)

Judah Monis (1683-1764) Tutor of Hebrew (1722-1760). He received an honorary MA in 1723 from Harvard, becoming the first Jew to receive an academic degree in the North American colonies.

Benjamin Wadsworth (1669-1737)

1725-1737

Henry Flynt (1676-1760) Tutor of mathematics and natural philosophy (1699-1760)

Edward Wigglesworth, Sr. (1693-1765) First Hollis Professor of Divinity (1722-1765)

Judah Monis (1683-1764) Tutor of Hebrew (1722-1760)

Isaac Greenwood (1702-1745) First Hollis Chair of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1728-1738)

Edward Holyoke (1689-1769)

1737-1769

Henry Flynt (1676-1760) Tutor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1699-1760)

Edward Wigglesworth, Sr. (1693-1765) First Hollis Professor of Divinity (1722-1765)

Isaac Greenwood (1702-1745) First Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1728-1738)

John Winthrop (1714-1779) Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1739-1780). The most renowned scientist of Colonial America next to Benjamin Franklin.

Edward Wigglesworth, Jr. (1732-1794) Tutor (1764-1765). Hollis Professor of Divinity (1765-1791)

Joseph Willard (1738-1804) Tutor in Greek (1766-1772). Later President of Harvard.

 

First Instructor of Logic appointed in 1767. In 1766-67 Harvard reorganized the tutor system, assigning tutors to specific subjects rather than to a group of students. A series of ten instructors on logic held this position until Levi Hedgeís appointment in 1795.

Samuel Locke (1732-1778)

 

Samuel Langdon (1723-1797)

 

Edward Wigglesworth, Jr. (1732-1794) [acting President]

1770-1773

 

 

1774-1780

 

 

1780-1781

 

John Winthrop (1714-1779) Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1739-1780)

Edward Wigglesworth, Jr. (1732-1794) Hollis Professor of Divinity (1765-1791)

Joseph Willard (1738-1804) Tutor in Greek (1766-1772). Later President of Harvard.

Joseph Willard (1738-1804)

1781-1804

Edward Wigglesworth, Jr. (1732-1794) Hollis Professor of Divinity (1765-1791)

Samuel Williams (1743-1817) Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1780-1788)

Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Oriental Languages (1786-1806). Later Acting President of Harvard.

Samuel Webber (1759-1810) Tutor (1787-1789). Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1789-1810). His System of Mathematics (1801) for a long time was almost the only text-book on that subject in New England colleges.

David Tappan (1752-1803) Hollis Professor of Divinity (1792-1803)

Levi Hedge (1766-1844) Tutor (1795-1810). Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1810-27). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1827-1832). His Elements of Logic (later published in 1816) and his Scottish realism was influential at Harvard.

Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826) [acting President]

 

 

Samuel Webber (1759-1810)

 

 

Henry Ware (1764-1845) [acting President]

1804-1806

 

 

 

 

1806-1810

 

 

 

1810

Eliphalet Pearson (1752-1826) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Oriental Languages (1786-1806).

Samuel Webber (1759-1810) Tutor (1787-1789). Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1789-1810). Later President of Harvard.

Levi Hedge (1766-1844) Tutor (1795-1810). Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1810-27). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1827-1832).

Henry Ware (1764-1845) Hollis Professor of Divinity (1805-1840). In 1816 he joined the new Divinity School faculty. Served as Acting President twice. His Unitarian stance angered the Trinitarians (including President Pearson) who started Andover Seminary in 1808.

Levi Frisbie (1783-1822) Tutor of Latin (1805-1810). Professor of Latin (1811-1817). First Alford Professor of natural religion, moral philosophy, and civil polity (1817-1822).

John Farrar (1779-1853) Tutor of Greek (1805-1807). Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1807-1836).

John Thornton Kirkland (1770-1840)

1810-1828

Levi Hedge (1766-1844) Tutor (1795-1810). Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1810-27). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1827-1832).

Henry Ware (1764-1845) Hollis Professor of Divinity (1805-1840). In 1816 he joined the new Divinity School faculty.

Levi Frisbie (1783-1822) Tutor of Latin (1805-1810). Professor of Latin (1811-1817). First Alford Professor of natural religion, moral philosophy, and civil polity (1817-1822).

John Farrar (1779-1853) Tutor of Greek (1805-1807). Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1807-1836).

Andrews Norton (1786-1853) Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Criticism (1813-1819). Dexter Professor of Sacred Literature (1819-1829).

Edward Everett (1795-1865) Professor of Greek literature (1815-1826). Later President of Harvard.

George Ticknor (1791-1871) Professor of Belles Lettres, French and Spanish (1819-1835)

Edward Tyrell Channing (1790ñ1856) Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1819-1851)

Henry Ware (1764-1845) [acting President]

 

 

Josiah Quincy (1772-1864)

1828-1829

 

 

 

 

1829-1845

Levi Hedge (1766-1844) Tutor (1795-1810). Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1810-27). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1827-1832).

Henry Ware (1764-1845) Hollis Professor of Divinity (1805-1840). In 1816 he joined the new Divinity School faculty.

John Farrar (1779-1853) Tutor of Greek (1805-1807). Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Philosophy (1807-1836).

Andrews Norton (1786-1853) Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Criticism (1813-1819). Dexter Professor of Sacred Literature (1819-1829).

Edward Tyrell Channing (1790-1856) Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1819-1851)

George Ticknor (1791-1871) Professor of Belles Lettres, French and Spanish (1819-1835)

Henry Ware, Jr. (1794-1843) Professor of Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care (1830-1842)

Francis Bowen (1811-1890) Instructor in intellectual philosophy and political economy (1835-1839).

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) Smith Professor of Belles-Lettres, French and Spanish (1836-1854)

Jared Sparks (1789-1866) McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History (1838-1849). Later President of Harvard.

James Walker (1794-1874) Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity (1839-1853). Later was President of Harvard.

George Rapall Noyes (1798-1868) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature (1840-1868)

Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) University Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1836-1838); University Professor of Mathematics (1838-1842); University Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1842-1880)

James Walker (1794-1874) [acting President]  

 

 

Edward Everett (1794-1865)

 

 

 

Jared Sparks (1789-1866)

1845-1846

 

 

 

 

 

1846-1849

 

 

 

 

1849-1853

Edward Tyrell Channing (1790ñ1856) Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1819-1851)

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) Smith Professor of Belles-Lettres, French and Spanish (1836-1854)

Jared Sparks (1789-1866) McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History (1838-1853). Later was President of Harvard.

James Walker (1794-1874) Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity (1839-1853).

Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) University Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1836-1838); University Professor of Mathematics (1838-1842); University Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1842-1880)

___________________________________________

Harvard Divinity School

George Rapall Noyes (1798-1868) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature (1840-1868)

Convers Francis (1795-1863) Parkman Professor of Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care (1842-1863)

James Walker (1794-1874)

1853-1860

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) Smith Professor of Belles-Lettres, French and Spanish (1836-1854)

Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) University Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1836-1838); University Professor of Mathematics (1838-1842); University Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1842-1880)

Francis Bowen (1811ñ1890) Instructor in Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1835-1839). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity (1853-1889)

____________________________________________

Harvard Divinity School

George Rapall Noyes (1798-1868) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature (1840-1868)

Convers Francis (1795-1863) Parkman Professor of Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care (1842-1863)

Frederic Henry Hedge (1805-1890) Professor of ecclesiastical history at Harvard Divinity School (1857-1860). Professor of German (1872-1881). Son of Levi Hedge.

Cornelius Conway Felton (1807-1862)

1860-1862

Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) University Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1836-1838); University Professor of Mathematics (1838-1842); University Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1842-1880)

Francis Bowen (1811ñ1890) Instructor in Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1835-1839). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity (1853-1889)

___________________________________________

Harvard Divinity School

George Rapall Noyes (1798-1868) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature (1840-1868)

Convers Francis (1795-1863) Parkman Professor of Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care (1842-1863)

Frederic Henry Hedge (1805-1890) Professor of ecclesiastical history at Harvard Divinity School (1857-1860). Professor of German (1872-1881). Son of Levi Hedge.

Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-1893) Plummer Professor of Christian Morals (1860-1881)

Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-1893) [acting President]  

 

 

Thomas Hill (1818-1891)

 

 

 

Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-1893)  [acting President]

1862

 

 

 

 

 

1862-1868

 

 

 

 

1868-1869

Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) University Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1836-1838); University Professor of Mathematics (1838-1842); University Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1842-1880)

Francis Bowen (1811ñ1890) Instructor in Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1835-1839). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity (1853-1889)

_________________________________________

Harvard Divinity School

George Rapall Noyes (1798-1868) Hancock Professor of Hebrew and Other Oriental Languages and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical Literature (1840-1868)

Convers Francis (1795-1863) Parkman Professor of Pulpit Eloquence and Pastoral Care (1842-1863)

Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-1893) Plummer Professor of Christian Morals (1860-1881)

 

Charles William Eliot  (1834-1926)

 

1869-1909

Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) University Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1836-1838); University Professor of Mathematics (1838-1842); University Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1842-1880)

Frederic Henry Hedge (1805-1890) Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Harvard Divinity School (1857-1860). Professor of German (1872-1881).

Francis Bowen (1811ñ1890) Instructor in Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1835-1839). Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity (1853-1889)

Charles Franklin Dunbar (1830-1900 ) Professor of Political Economy (1871-1900)

George Herbert Palmer (1842-1933) Tutor of Greek (1870-1872). Professor of Philosophy (1872-1889). Alford Professor of Philosophy (1889-1913).

William James (1842-1910) Instructor, Assistant Professor of Physiology (1873-1879). Professor of Philosophy (1879-1889, 1897-1907). Professor of Psychology (1889-1897). Introduces psychology courses at Harvard in 1875.

Josiah Royce (1855-1916) Professor of Philosophy (1882-1916)

George Santayana (1863-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1889-1912)

Hugo Munsterberg (1863-1916) Professor of Psychology (1892-1895, 1897-1916)

Ralph Barton Perry (1876-1957) Professor of Philosophy (1902-1946)

_______________________________________

Harvard Divinity School

Charles Carroll Everett (1829-1900) First Bussey Professor of Theology, New Testament Criticism, and Interpretation at Harvard Divinity School (1869-1900).

Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-1893) Plummer Professor of Christian Morals (1860-1881)

Francis Greenwood Peabody (1847-1936) Lecturer in Ethics and Homiletics (1880-1881). Parkman Professor of Theology (1881-1886). Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at Harvard Divinity School (1886-1912)

David Gordon Lyon (1852-1935) Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School (1882-1910)

 

Abbott Lawrence Lowell (1856-1943)

 

1909-1933

George Herbert Palmer (1842-1933) Tutor of Greek (1870-1872). Professor of Philosophy (1872-1889). Alford Professor of Philosophy (1889-1913).

Josiah Royce (1855-1916) Professor of Philosophy (1882-1916)

George Santayana (1863-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1889-1912)

Hugo Munsterberg (1863-1916) Professor of Psychology (1892-1895, 1897-1916)

Ralph Barton Perry (1876-1957) Professor of Philosophy (1902-1946)

William Ernest Hocking (1873-1966) Professor of Philosophy (1914-1943)

Raphael Demos (1892-1968) Professor of Philosophy (1916-1962)

Henry Maurice Sheffer (1883-1964) Professor of Philosophy (1916-1954)

Clarence Irving Lewis (1883-1964) Professor of Philosophy (1920-1953)

 

 

 

 

College of William and Mary

 

 

Period

President

Other Faculty

 

1693-1743

James Blair (1656-1743) President (1693-1743). Taught philosophy, theology, and other subjects.

King William III and Queen Mary II granted a charter to establish The College of William and Mary in 1693. The Collegeís unusually generous charter provided for a President and six Professors, including a Professor of Moral Philosophy. The College was frequently forced to operate below this full teaching capacity. The provision for this maximum of six Professors remained until 1888.

 

William Dawson (1704-1752) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1729-52)

 

1743-1771

William Dawson (1704-1752)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1743-1752)

 

William Stith (1707-1755)

President (1752-1755)

 

 

 

 

Thomas Dawson (c1710-1761)

President (1755-1761)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Yates (1720-1764)

President (1761-1764)

 

 

 

 

James Horrocks (1734-1772)

President (1764-1771) and Master of the grammar school (1762-1766)

 

 

 

Early Presidents after Dawson taught some theology. The Professor of Moral Philosophy typically also taught rhetoric, logic, Intellectual philosophy, and topics included within Ethics such as natural and civil law, history of government, and politics.

 

William Preston (1728-1778)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1752-1758)

 

Jacob Rowe (?-?) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1758-1760). Roweís political agitations and public drunkenness led to his dismissal.

 

William Small (1734-1775) Professor of Natural Philosophy and Mathematics (1758-1764), also Professor of Moral Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Belles-Lettres (1760).  "In 1760 he made a great departure from the practice, universally prevalent at that day, of memory lessons, by being the first professor at William and Mary, and, it is believed, the first in America, to adopt the modern lecture system." Thomas Jefferson was impressed by Smallís lectures on logic, moral philosophy, and natural philosophy..

 

Due to deaths and firings, by early 1761 only two faculty were left, Small and Emanuel Jones (master of the Indian school). That yearís appointment of Yates as President and reinstatement of Graham as Professor of Moral Philosophy temporarily stabilized the college.

 

Richard Graham (1720-?)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1761-1764). Graham also was Professor of Natural Philosophy and Mathematics (1749-1757, 1764-1766). In 1766 he returned to England where he was an Oxford fellow.

 

From 1764 to 1779 the College was again disrupted by colony politics and college power struggles. Frequently the number of professors dropped to two or three, so the duties of philosophy teaching rotated frequently.

 

Josiah Johnson (?-1773)

Professor of Humanity [the Master of the grammar school] (1766-1773), Professor of Moral Philosophy (1767-1770).

 

John Camm (1718-1779)

Divinity Professor (1749-1757, 1763-1777). He was teaching most of the natural and moral philosophy courses during the period of 1764 to 1769.

 

1771-1812

John Camm (1718-1779)

President (1771-1777)

 

 

 

 

 

James Madison (1749-1812)

President (1777-1812). Also Professor of Natural Philosophy and Mathematics (1773-1775, 1777-1784), then Professor of Natural Philosophy and Moral Philosophy (1784-1812). He was a cousin of U.S. President James Madison.

 

 

 

 

With the arrival of more appointments, all six Professorships were teaching in 1770, a situation unseen since the early 1750s. By 1777, however, only President Madison and John Bracken (Master of the grammar school) were left.

 

Samuel T. Henley (1745-1815) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1770-1775). He returned to England upon signs of Virginiaís rebellion.

In 1777 Andrews was hired for teaching moral philosophy. In 1779, under Thomas Jeffersonís leadership as a Visitor, the College abolished the grammar school and the two professorships of Divinity and Oriental Languages, making room for three new chairs in modern languages, law, and medicine. To Moral Philosophy extra teaching duties were added.

 

Robert Andrews (c1748-1804) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1777-1779), Professor of Moral Philosophy, the Law of Nature and of Nations, and the Fine Arts (1779-1784), Professor of Mathematics (1784-1804). Andrews was the first professor of fine arts in America. Although Madison gets credited with the first lecturing on ìpolitical economyî it was Andrews (on Jeffersonís plan) who taught international law and political theory first. Government had been part of the moral philosophy curricula since the early 1700s.

 

George Wythe (1726-1806) Professor of Law and Police (1779-1790). Wythe held the first professorship of law in America.

 

St. George Tucker (1752-1827) Professor of Law (1790-1803)

 

1812-1836

John Bracken (1745-1818)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1812-1814)

 

John Augustine Smith (1782-1865) 

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1814-1826)

 

William Holland Wilmer (1782-1827)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1826-1827)

 

Adam Empie (1785ñ1860) President (1827-1836) 

After Madisonís presidency, Presidents continued to frequently teach Moral Philosophy, which included natural and international law and political theory. In 1817 President Smith declared that he was only professor of political science in America.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Roderick Dew (1802-1846) Professor of Political Law (1827-1836) and Moral Philosophy (1828-1846). Taught metaphysics, history, government, and political economy. Became President.

 

 

 

Nathaniel Beverley Tucker (1784-1851) Professor of Law (1834-1851)

 

1836-1888

Thomas Roderick Dew (1802-1846)  President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1836-1846)

 

Robert Saunders, Jr. (1805-1868)

President (1847-1848)

 

John Johns (1796-1876) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1849-1854)

 

 

 

Benjamin Stoddart Ewell (1810-1894)

President and Professor of Natural Philosophy and Mathematics (1854-1888)

George Frederick Holmes (1820-1897) Professor of History and Political Economy (1847-1848)

 

Archibald Cary Peachy (1820-1883) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1847-1848)

 

In 1848 all of the faculty except Tucker (Law) resigned over a dispute whether to move the College to Richmond. The College resumed operations in 1849 with a new President and new professors.

 

Silas Totten (1804-1873) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Science and Belles-Lettres (1849-1859). This position has been well-described as ìprofessor of rhetoric and mental philosophyî for listing its actual duties. The term ìScienceî was also convenient for avoiding duplication of titles, as President John Johns was teaching moral philosophy.

 

From 1859 to 1869 the Collegeís operations were minimal due to fires and the Civil War.

 

George Thornton Wilmer (1819-1898)

Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Belles-Lettres (1869-1876)

 

The Collegeís financial problems caused the College to close in 1881. It reopened in 1888 as a college for training teachers.

 

1888-

Lyon Gardiner Tyler (1853-1935 )

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1888-1898)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hugh Stockdale Bird (1869-1931) Professor of Methods and Pedagogics (1888-1893), Professor of Pedagogy (1893-1898), Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy (1898-1904)

 

Bruce Ryburn Payne (1874-1937)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1904-1905)

 

Alexander Brainard Coffey (?-1915) Professor of Philosophy and Education (1905-1907)

 

George Oscar Ferguson, Jr. (1885-1960) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1907-1913), Professor of Philosophy, Psychology, and Education (1913-1916)

 

Joseph Roy Geiger (1887-1935) Professor of Philosophy, Psychology, and Education (1916-1919),† Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1919-1935)

 

 

 

 

Yale University

 

Rector/President

Term             

Other faculty

Abraham Pierson (1641-1707). Taught some Greek, Latin, Hebrew, and theology

1701-1707

Pierson served concurrently as the minister of the Killingworth (now Clinton) Congregational church, where the ìCollegiate Schoolî was based during his tenure.

Samuel Andrew (?-?)

In 1716 the school moved to New Haven. Renamed Yale College in 1718.

1707-1719

Samuel Johnson (1696-1772) Tutor (1716-1719). Later President of Kingís College (Columbia).

Timothy Cutler (1684-1765)

1719-1722

With Johnson, Cutler converted to Anglicanism in 1722 and resigned.

Elisha Williams (1694-1755)

1726-1739

 

Thomas Clap (1703-1767). Clap was a foremost expert in mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy.

1740-1765

Napthali Daggett (1727-1780) First Livingston Professor of Divinity (1754-1777). Later President of Yale.

Ezra Stiles (1727-1795) Tutor (1749-1755). Later was President of Yale.

Naphtali Daggett (1727-1780). First Livingston Professor of Divinity (1754-1777).

1766-1777

 

Ezra Stiles (1727-1795)

1778-1795

Stiles was obliged to take on most of the advanced instruction himself. ìOne of the most learned men of his time in America.î

Timothy Dwight IV (1752-1817).

1795-1817

The College consisted of only five tutors at the time of his accession, but soon Dwight added a Professor of Law in 1801, a Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in 1803, a Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy in 1804, and a Professor of Hebrew, Greek and Latin in 1805.

 

Jeremiah Day (1773-1867) Tutor (1798-1801). Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1803-1817). Later became President of Yale.

Josiah Willard Gibbs (1790-1861) Tutor (1811-1815). Lecturer in Biblical Literature (1824-1826). Professor of Sacred Literature (1826-1861).

Jeremiah Day (1773-1867)

1817-1846

Nathaniel William Taylor (1786-1858) Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology (1822-1858) 

Theodore Dwight Woolsey (1801-1899) Professor of Greek (1831-1846). Later was President of Yale.

Eleazar Thompson Fitch (1791-1871) Livingston Professor of Divinity (1817-1852). Lecturer on Homiletics at Yale Divinity School (1824 to 1861).

Chauncey Allen Goodrich (1790-1860) First Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1818-1839). Professor of Homiletics and the Pastoral Charge at Yale Divinity School (1839-1860).

Theodore Dwight Woolsey (1801-1899)

1846-1871

Nathaniel William Taylor (1786-1858) Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology (1822-1858) 

Eleazar Thompson Fitch (1791-1871) Livingston Professor of Divinity (1817-1852). Lecturer on Homiletics at Yale Divinity School (1824 to 1861).

Chauncey Allen Goodrich (1790-1860) First Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1818-1839). Professor of Homiletics and the Pastoral Charge at Yale Divinity School (1839-1860).

Noah Porter (1811-1892) First Clark Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1847-1892)

George Park Fisher (1827-1909) Livingston Professor of Divinity (1854-1861). Professor of Ecclesiastical History (1861-1901).

Noah Porter (1811-1892). First Clark Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1847-1892). Taught all courses in mental and moral philosophy, history of philosophy, natural theology, and evidences of Christianity.

1871-1886

William Graham Sumner (1840-1910) Professor of Political and Social Science (1872-1910).

George Trumbull Ladd (1842-1921) Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy (1881-1906)

Timothy Dwight V (1828-1916)

1886-1899

Noah Porter (1811-1892) First Clark Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1847-1892)

William Graham Sumner (1840-1910) Professor of Political and Social Science (1872-1910).

George Trumbull Ladd (1842-1921) Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy (1881-1892). Clark Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1892-1905).

George Martin Duncan (1857-1928) Professor of Philosophy (1888-1904). Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1904-1923).

Elias Hershey Sneath (1857-1935) Professor of Philosophy (c1891-1905). Professor of Theory and Practice of Education (1905-?).

Edward Wheeler Scripture (1864-1945) Assistant Professor of Psychology (1892-1903)

Arthur Twining Hadley  (1856-1930)

1899-1921

William Graham Sumner (1840-1910) Professor of Political and Social Science (1872-1910).

George Trumbull Ladd (1842-1921) Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy (1881-1905)

George Martin Duncan (1857-1928) Professor of Philosophy (1888-1904). Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1904-1923).

Elias Hershey Sneath (1857-1935) Professor of Philosophy (c1891-1905). Professor of Theory and Practice of Education (1905-?).

Edward Wheeler Scripture (1864-1945) Assistant Professor of Psychology (1892-1903)

Charles Hubbard Judd (1873-1946) Professor of Psychology (1902-1909)

Charles Montague Bakewell (1867-1957) Clark Professor of Philosophy (1905-1933)

William Ernest Hocking (1873-1966) Professor of Philosophy (1908-1914)

Douglas Clyde Macintosh (1877-1948) Professor of Systematic Theology (1909-1916), Dwight Professor of Theology (1916-1933), Dwight Professor of Theology and Philosophy of Religion (1933-1942)

Wilmon Henry Sheldon (1875-1980) Professor of Philosophy (1920-1943).

 

 

 

 

Princeton University

 

President

Term

Other Faculty

Jonathan Dickinson (1688-1747)

1746-1747

College of New Jersey founded in 1746. Renamed Princeton University in 1896.

Classes were held in Dickinsonís parsonage in Elizabeth, N.J. Early Presidents taught all classes with tutor assistance.

Aaron Burr, Sr. (1716-1757)

1747-1757

Classes were held at Burrís Newark Church until 1756 when the college moved to Princeton.

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758)

1757-1758

Edwards had barely started classes before his death.

Samuel Davies (1723-1761)

1759-1761

 

Samuel Finley (1715-1766)

1761-1766

 

John Witherspoon (1723-1794)

 

1768-1794

To the Collegeís faculty of five (three tutors and two professors), Witherspoon added a professor of mathematics and natural philosophy, leaving him responsible for providing instruction in moral philosophy, divinity, rhetoric, history, and French.

 

Samuel Stanhope Smith (1751-1819) Tutor (1771-1773). Professor of Moral Philosophy (1779-1812). Professor of Theology (1783-1812).

William Churchill Houston (1746-1788) Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1771-1783)

Ashbel Green (1762-1848) Tutor (1883-1885). Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1885-1887).

Walter Minto (1753-1796) Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1887-1796).

Samuel Stanhope Smith (1751-1819). Professor of Moral Philosophy (1779-1812), and Professor of Theology (1783-1812).

1795-1812

John Maclean (1771-1814) Professor of Chemistry (1795-1796). Professor of Chemistry, Mathematics, and Natural Philosophy (1797-1812)

James Carnahan (1775-1859) Tutor (1800-1803). Became President.

 

By 1812 the four professors and finally Smith all resigned.

Ashbel Green (1762-1848)

1812-1822

Jacob Green (1790-1841) Professor of Chemistry, Experimental Philosophy, and Natural History (1818-1822). Ashbel Greenís son.

John Maclean, Jr. (1800-1886) Tutor of Greek (1818-1820). Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1822-1829). Professor of Classics (1829-1847). Vice-President (1847-1854).

James Carnahan (1775-1859). Taught moral philosophy. 

1823-1854

For several years Carnahan and Maclean were the only faculty. Princeton survived by the addition of three distinguished professors: mathematician Albert B. Dod; John Torrey, professor of chemistry and botany; and Joseph Henry, the inventor and physicist.

 

John Maclean, Jr. (1800-1886) Tutor of Greek (1818-1820). Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1822-1829). Professor of Classics (1829-1847). Vice-President (1847-1854). Became President.

John Maclean, Jr. (1800-1886)

1854-1868

Lyman Hotchkiss Atwater (1813-1883) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1854-1861). Professor of Revealed Religion and Metaphysics (1861-1867). Professor of Logic, Metaphysics, Ethics, Economics, and Politics (1869-1883).

Charles Woodruff Shields (1823-1904) Professor of the Harmony of Science and Revealed Religion (1866-1903). Also Professor of Modern History (1869-1882).

James McCosh (1811-1894)

McCosh taught regular classes in the history of philosophy and psychology, and defended evolution.

1868-1888

Lyman Hotchkiss Atwater (1813-1883) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1854-1861). Professor of Revealed Religion and Metaphysics (1861-1867). Professor of Logic, Metaphysics, Ethics, Economics, and Politics (1869-1883).

Charles Woodruff Shields (1823-1904) Professor of the Harmony of Science and Revealed Religion (1866-1903)

George Lansing Raymond (1839-1929) Professor of Oratory and Aesthetics Criticism (1880-1893). Professor of Aesthetics (1893-1905)

Alexander Thomas Ormond (1874ñ1915) Stuart Professor of Mental Science and Logic (1883-1898). McCosh Professor of Philosophy (1898-1903).

Francis Landey Patton (1843-1932) Professor of Ethics (1884-1910s). Also taught philosophy of religion, and theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. Became President.

Alexander Johnston (1859-1889) Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Economy (1884-1889)

Francis Landey Patton (1843-1932). Also taught ethics and philosophy of religion from 1884 into the 1910s. In 1902 he became President of Princeton Theological Seminary.

1888-1902

Charles Woodruff Shields (1823-1904) Professor of the Harmony of Science and Revealed Religion (1866-1903).

George Lansing Raymond (1839-1929) Professor of Oratory and Aesthetics Criticism (1880-1893). Professor of Aesthetics (1893-1905).

John Grier Hibben (1861-1933) Instructor, Assistant Professor of logic (1891-1897). Stuart Professor of Logic (1897-1912). Later was President of Princeton.

James Mark Baldwin (1861-1934) Professor of Psychology (1893-1903)

Alexander Thomas Ormond (1874ñ1915) Stuart Professor of Mental Science and Logic (1883-1898). McCosh Professor of Philosophy (1898-1913).

Alexander Johnston (1859-1889) Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Economy (1884-1889)

Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924)

1902-1910

George Lansing Raymond (1839-1929) Professor of Oratory and Aesthetics Criticism (1880-1893). Professor of Aesthetics (1893-1905).

John Grier Hibben (1861-1933) Instructor, Assistant Professor of logic (1891-1897). Stuart Professor of Logic (1897-1912). Later was President of Princeton.

Alexander Thomas Ormond (1874ñ1915) Stuart Professor of Mental Science and Logic (1883-1898). McCosh Professor of Philosophy (1898-1913).

Edward Gleason Spaulding (1873-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1940)

Walter Taylor Marvin (1905- ) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1910)

Norman Kemp-Smith (1872-1958) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1919)

John Grier Hibben (1861-1933)

 

1912-1932

Edward Gleason Spaulding (1873-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1940)

Norman Kemp-Smith (1872-1958) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1919)

Robert M. Scoon (1886-?) Professor of Classics (1911-1914, 1915-1923), Professor of Philosophy (1923-1955)

Archibald Allan Bowman (1883-1936) Professor of Logic (1912-1914, 1919-1926)

Warner Fite (1867-1955) Professor of Philosophy (1915-1935)

Charles William Hendel, Jr. (1890-1982) Professor of Philosophy (1920-1929)

 

 

Princeton Theological Seminary

 

Era

 

Faculty   

Administered by its faculty with a rotation of leadership until 1902. Its first president was Francis Landey Patton.

1812-1850

Archibald Alexander (1772-1851) Professor of Theology and Philosophy (1812-1850). Father of James and Joseph Alexander, professors at Princeton Theological Seminary.

Samuel Miller (1769-1850) Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Government (1813-1849)

Charles Hodge (1797-1878) Professor of  Oriental and Biblical Literature (1820-1840). Professor of Exegetical and Didactic Theology (1840-1852). Professor of Exegetical, Didactic, and Polemical Theology (1852-1877). His son Archibald became a professor at Princeton Theological Seminary.

James Waddell Alexander (1804-1859) Professor of Rhetoric (1833-1844). Professor of Church History (1844-1851) 

1850-1886

Charles Hodge (1797-1878) Professor of  Oriental and Biblical Literature (1820-1840). Professor of Exegetical and Didactic Theology (1840-1852). Professor of Exegetical, Didactic, and Polemical Theology (1852-1877). His son Archibald became a professor at Princeton Theological Seminary.

Joseph Addison Alexander (1809-1860) Assistant, then Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament (1834-1851).  Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History (1851-1859). Professor of Hellenistic and New Testament Literature (1859-1860).

William Henry Green (1825-1900) Instructor of Hebrew (1846-1849). Professor of Oriental and Old Testament Literature (1851-1859). Professor of Biblical and Oriental Literature (1859-1900).

Archibald Alexander Hodge (1823-1886) Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology (1877-1886)

1887-1920

William Henry Green (1825-1900) Instructor of Hebrew (1846-1849). Professor of Oriental and Old Testament Literature (1851-1859). Professor of Biblical and Oriental Literature (1859-1900).

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851-1921) Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology (1887-1921)

Francis Landey Patton (1843-1932) Stewart Professor of Relations of Philosophy and Science to the Christian Religion (1881-1913). In 1902 he became President of Princeton Theological Seminary.

 

 

 

Columbia University

 

Era

President

Other Faculty

1754-1775

Samuel Johnson (1691-1772)

President (1754-1763). Johnson published An Introduction to Philosophy (1731) and other philosophical and religious texts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Myles Cooper (1737-1785)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1763-1775). Also taught divinity, theology, and classics.

Founded as Kingís College in 1754. During both Johnsonís and Cooperís presidencies, Kingís had at most three professors at any one time, and rarely more than thirty students.

 

Leonard Cutting (1735-1794) Tutor of rhetoric and classics (1756-1763)

Daniel Treadwell (?-1760) Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1757-1760)

Robert Harpur (1731-1825) Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1761-1765). Professor of Mathematics (1765-1775). Also taught logic and classics.

Myles Cooper (1737-1785) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1762-1775). Became President of Kingís College.

Samuel Clossy (1724-1786) Professor of Natural Philosophy (1765-1775)

1784-1811

Samuel William Johnson (1727-1819)

President (1787-1800)

 

Charles Henry Wharton (1748-1833)

President (1800). Also professor of moral philosophy and rhetoric.

 

Benjamin Moore (1748-1816)

President (1801-1811)

Closed in 1775. Reopened in 1784 as Columbia College, but operates without a President for three years.

 

John Daniel Gros (1737-1812) Professor of German and Geography (1784-1787). Professor of Moral Philosophy (1787-1795).

John McKnight (1754-1823) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Logic (1795-1799)

 

John Bowden (1751-1817) Professor of Moral Philosophy, Logic, Rhetoric, and Belles-letters (1801-1817).

1811-1864

William Harris (1765-1829)

President (1811-1829)

 

William Alexander Duer (1780-1858)

President (1829-1842)

Nathaniel Fish Moore (1782-1872)

President (1842-1849)

 

Charles King (1889-1867)

President (1849-1864)

 

John Bowden (1751-1817) Professor of Moral Philosophy, Logic, Rhetoric, and Belles-letters (1801-1817).

 

John McVickar (1787-1868) Professor of Moral Philosophy, Logic, Rhetoric, and Belles-letters (1817-1857). Also Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1818-1857). Professor of Evidences of Natural and Revealed Religion (1857-1864).

Francis Lieber (1800-1872) Professor of History and Political Economy (1856-1865). Professor of Political Science at Columbia Law School (1860-1872).

Charles Murray Nairne (1808-1882) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Literature (1857-1881). Professor of the Ethics of Jurisprudence (1860-1868). Professor of History and Political Economy (1865-1876).

1864-1902

Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard (1809-1889)

President (1864-1890)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seth Low (1850-1916)

President (1890-1902)

Francis Lieber (1800-1872) Professor of History and Political Economy (1856-1865). Professor of Political Science at Columbia Law School (1860-1872).

Charles Murray Nairne (1808-1882) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Literature (1857-1881). Professor of the Ethics of Jurisprudence (1860-1868). Professor of History and Political Economy (1865-1876).

John William Burgess (1844-1931) Professor of History, Political Science, and International Law (1876-1912)

Archibald Alexander (1855-1917) Adjunct Professor of Philosophy (1877-1881). Professor of Philosophy, Ethics, and Psychology (1881-1889)

Nicholas Murray Butler (1862-1947) Assistant Professor of Philosophy (1885-1886), Tutor in Philosophy (1886-1889), Professor of Philosophy (1889-1890), Dean of Faculty of Philosophy (1890-1902). Later became President of Columbia.

James Hervey Hyslop (1854-1920) Instructor of Ethics (1889-1895). Professor of Logic and Ethics (1895-1902). James McKeen Cattell (1860-1944) Professor of Psychology (1891-1917)

Charles Augustus Strong (1862-1940) Professor of Psychology (1895-1910)

1902-

Nicholas Murray Butler (1862-1947) 

President (1902-1945)

James McKeen Cattell (1860-1944) Professor of Psychology (1891-1917)

Charles Augustus Strong (1862-1940) Professor of Psychology (1895-1910)

Frederick James Eugene Woodbridge (1867-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1902-1904). Johnsonian Professor of Philosophy (1904-1939).

Felix Adler (1851-1933) Professor of Social and Political Ethics (1902-1933)

William Pepperell Montague, Jr. (1873-1953) Lecturer in Philosophy (1903-1907). Professor of Philosophy (1907-1941). Johnsonian Professor of Philosophy (1941-1947).

George Stuart Fullerton (1859-1925) Professor of Philosophy (1904-1917)

John Dewey (1859-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1930)

Wendell T. Bush (1866-1941) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1941)

John Jacob Coss (1884-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1911-1929). Moore Collegiate Professor of Philosophy (1929-1939).

 

 

 

University of Pennsylvania

 

 

Era

Provost

Other faculty

 

1755-1813

 

William Smith (1727-1803)

Provost (1755-1779). Also Professor of Ethics (1759-1779).

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1755 Benjamin Franklinís ìAcademy of Philadelphiaî was chartered as the College of Philadelphia.

 

Francis Alison (1705-1779) Vice Provost and Professor of Classics, Moral Philosophy, Logic, and Metaphysics (1755-1779)

John Ewing (1732-1802) Professor of Ethics (1758-1762), Professor of Natural Philosophy (1762-1778). Became Provost.

Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) Professor of Chemistry (1769-1776)

 

John Ewing (1732-1802)

Provost (1779-1802). Also Professor of Natural Philosophy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

No provost from 1802 to 1806.

 

John McDowell (1751-1820)

Provost (1806-1810). Also Professor of Natural Philosophy.

 

John Andrews (1746-1813)

Provost (1810-1813). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy (1789-1813)

In 1779 the College was dissolved and a University of the State of Pennsylvania was chartered, with Ewing as Provost.

 

Samuel Magaw (1735-1812) Vice Provost and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1782-1789)

 

1789 the College of Philadelphia was restored with Smith as Provost. But it soon merged in 1791 with the University of the State of Pennsylvania under a new charter issued for the ìUniversity of Pennsylvaniaî. Ewing continued as its Provost.

 

John Andrews (1746-1813) Vice Provost (1789-1810) and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1789-1813). Became Provost.

 

Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) Professor of Medicine (1789-1813).

 

 

1813-1860

Frederick Beasley (1777-1845)

Provost (1813-1828). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy.

 

William Heathcote De Lancey (1797-1865)

Provost (1828-1834). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy.

 

John Ludlow (1793-1857)

Provost (1834-1852). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy (1834-1854)

 

Henry Vethake (1792-1866)

Provost (1853-1859). Also Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy.

Four Professors led the College (the Medical school completed the University) during this era: The Provost taught moral philosophy; the Vice Provost taught natural philosophy; the Professor of mathematics; and the Professor of ancient languages. Tutors and instructors added modern languages.

 

Edward Rutledge (1797-1836)

Assistant Professor of Moral Philosophy (1828-1831). Taught English Literature.

 

Henry Hope Reed (1808-1854) Assistant Professor of Moral Philosophy (1831-1833)

 

 

Henry Vethake (1792-1866) Professor of Mathematics (1836-1855). Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1855-1859). Became Provost.

 

 

1860-1894

Daniel Raynes Goodwin (1811-1890)

Provost (1860-1868). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy.

 

Charles Janeway StillÈ (1819-1899)

Provost (1868-1880). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy.

 

William Pepper, Jr.  (1843-1898)

Provost (1881-1894)

 

 

 

 

 

George Stuart Fullerton (1859-1925) First Adam Seybert Professor in Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1883-1904)

 

James McKeen Cattell (1860-1944) Professor of Psychology (1887-1891)

 

William Romaine Newbold (1892-1894) Professor of Philosophy (1894-1907). Adam Seybert Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1907-1926).

 

1894-

Charles Custis Harrison (1844-1929) Provost (1894-1910)

George Stuart Fullerton (1859-1925) First Adam Seybert Professor in Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1883-1904)

William Romaine Newbold (1892-1894) Professor of Philosophy (1894-1907). Adam Seybert Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1907-1926).

Edgar Arthur Singer, Jr. (1873-1954) Professor of Philosophy (1898-1929). Adam Seybert Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1929-1944).

 

 

 

Brown University

 

 

Era

President

Other Faculty

1765-1826

James Manning (1738-1791)

President (1765-1779). Taught moral philosophy.

 

Jonathan Maxcy (1768-1820)

President (1792-1802). Taught moral philosophy.

 

Asa Messer (1769-1836)

President (1802-1826)

Founded as College of Rhode Island in 1765. Renamed Brown University in 1804.

 

Asa Messer (1769-1836) Tutor (1791-1796). Professor of Learned Languages (1796-1799). Professor of Natural Philosophy (1799-1802). Later President of Brown.

Calvin Park (1774-1847) Tutor (1800-1804). Professor of Languages (1804-1811). Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1811-1825).

Horace Mann (1796-1859) Tutor (1820-1822)

1826-1871

Francis Wayland (1796-1865)

President (1826-1855). Taught psychology, political economy, and ethics. Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1834-1855).

 

Barnas Sears (1802-1880)

President (1855-1867). Also Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy.

 

Alexis Caswell (1799-1877)

President (1867-1872). Also Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1867-1871).

William Giles Goddard (1794-1846) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1825-1834). Professor of Rhetoric, Evidences of Religion, and Constitutional Law (1834-1842).

Alexis Caswell (1799-1877) Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1828-1850). Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1850-1855). Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy (1855-1863). He also taught Ethics and Constitutional Law. Later President of Brown.

 

Alexis Caswell (1799-1877) Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1828-1850). Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy (1850-1855). Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy (1855-1863). He also taught Ethics and Constitutional Law. Later President of Brown.

 

George Ide Chace (1808-1885) Professor of sciences (1833-1871). Also Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1867-1871).

1872-1899

Ezekiel Gilman Robinson (1815-1894)

President (1872-1889). Also professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy.

 

Elisha Benjamin Andrews (1844-1917)

President (1889-1898). Also professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy.

Elisha Benjamin Andrews (1844-1917) Professor of History and Political Economy (1882-1888). Later was President of Brown. Edmund Burke Delabarre (1863-1945) Professor of Psychology (1891-1932)

James Seth (1860-1924) Professor of Natural Theology (1892-1894). Professor of Philosophy and Natural Theology (1894-1896).

 

Walter Goodnow Everett (1860-1937) Professor of Philosophy (1894-1930)

1900-

William Herbert Perry Faunce (1859-1930)

President (1899-1929). Also Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy.

Edmund Burke Delabarre (1863-1945) Professor of Psychology (1891-1932)

Walter Goodnow Everett (1860-1937) Professor of Philosophy (1894-1930)

Alexander Meiklejohn (1872-1964) Professor of Logic and Metaphysics (1897-1913)

 

 

 

Dartmouth College

 

Era

President

Other Faculty

1769-1820

Eleazar Wheelock (1711-1779)

President (1769-1779)

 

John Wheelock (1754-1817)

President (1779-1815). Also Professor of History, Logic, Metaphysics, and Ethics

 

Francis Brown (1784-1820)

President (1815-1820)

Eleazar Wheelock obtained a charter for Dartmouth College in 1769.

 

 

 

Early presidents taught some divinity, along with logic, moral philosophy, and metaphysics. Professors in natural philosophy, languages, and divinity were gradually added.†

 

Roswell Shurtleff (1773-1861) Professor of Divinity (1804-1827), Professor of Moral Philosophy and Political Economy (1827-1838)

1820-1863

Daniel Dana (1771-1859)

President (1820-1821)

 

Bennett Tyler (1783-1858)

President (1822-1828). Also Professor of Christian Theology

 

Nathan Lord (1792-1870)

President (1828-1863). Also Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, and later Professor of Moral Philosophy (1838-1863)

Roswell Shurtleff (1773-1861) Professor of Divinity (1804-1827), Professor of Moral Philosophy and Political Economy (1827-1838)

 

Charles Brickett Haddock (1796-1861) Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1819-1838), Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1838-1850)

Daniel Oliver (1787-1842) Professor of Medicine (1820-1837), Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1823-1828), Professor of Intellectual Philosophy (1828-1836)

 

Clement Long (1806-1861) Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1854-1861)

1863-1909

Asa Dodge Smith (1804-1877)

President (1863-1877). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy

 

Samuel Colcord Bartlett (1817-1898)

President (1877-1892). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy.

 

William Jewett Tucker (1839-1926)

President (1893-1909). Also Professor of Moral Philosophy

Samuel Gilman Brown (1813-1885) Professor of Oratory and Belles-lettres (1840-1863), Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1863-1869)

 

Daniel J. Noyes (?-?) Professor of Divinity (1849-1869), Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1869-1883)

 

 

Gabriel Campbell (1838-1923) Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1883-1910)

1909-

Ernest Fox Nichols (1869-1924)

President (1909-1916)

 

Ernest Martin Hopkins (1877-1964)

President (1916-1945)

 

Wilmon Henry Sheldon (1875-1980) Professor of Philosophy (1909-1920)

William Kelley Wright (1877-1956) Professor of Philosophy (1916-1947)

Wilbur Marshall Urban (1873-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1920-1931)

 

 

 

Rutgers University

 

Era

President

Other faculty

1771-1808

Jacob Rusten Hardenbergh (1736-1790)

President (1786-1790). 

 

William Linn (1752-1808)

President (1791-1795).

 

Ira Condict (1764-1811)

Interim President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1794-1795, 1808-1811).

 

John Henry Livingston (1746-1825)

President (1810-1816), teaches theology.

 

Founded as Queenís College in 1771 and classes are taught in a tavern and then in private homes during its first decade. Operated without a president until 1786. Tutors gave instruction in moral philosophy and theology.

 

Tutors are Frederick Frelinghuysen (1771-1773) and John Taylor (1773-1790). Introductory logic and moral philosophy are taught.

Henry Van Dyke (?-1804)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1792-1794)

 

College closes in 1795, reopens in 1808.

 

John Schureman (1778-1818)

Professor of Moral Philosophy and Belles-letters (1811-1816)

 

College closes in 1816.

1825-1862

Philip Milledoler (1775-1852)†

President (1825-1840). Teaches moral philosophy.

 

Abraham Bruyn Hasbrouck (1791-1879)

President (1840-1850)

 

Theodore Frelinghuysen (1787-1862)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy and International and Constitutional Law (1850-1862)

The college is renamed Rutgers College and reopens in 1825 with three theology faculty.

 

James Spencer Cannon (1776-1852) Professor of Metaphysics and Philosophy of the Human Mind (1826-1852). Also Professor of Pastoral Theology and Ecclesiastical History for the Theological Seminary (1826-1852).

 

Samuel Alexander Van Vranken (1792-1861)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1841-1846), Professor of Evidences of Christianity and Logic (1846-1860)

 

John Ludlow (1793-1857)

Professor of Metaphysics and Philosophy of the Human Mind (1852-1857)

 

Samuel Merrill Woodbridge (1819-1905)

Professor of Metaphysics and Philosophy of the Human Mind (1857-1864)

1863-1906

William Henry Campbell (1808-1890)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1862-1863), President and Professor of Moral Philosophy, Evidences of Christianity, and Biblical Literature (1863-1882)

 

Merrill Edward Gates (1848-1922)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1882-1890)

 

Theodore Sandford Doolittle (1834-1893) Collegiate Church Professor of Rhetoric, Logic, and Mental Philosophy (1864-1893)

 

Jacob Cooper (1830-1904) Professor of Greek (1866-1893). Collegiate Church Professor of Logic and Mental Philosophy (1893-1904)

 

William Rankin Duryee (1838-1897)

Professor of Ethics, Evidences of Christianity, and the English Bible (1891-1897)

 

Charles Edward Hart (c1840-1916)

Professor of Ethics, Evidences of Christianity, and the English Bible (1897-1903), Professor of Ethics and Evidences of Christianity (1903-1906)

 

1906-1920s

 

William Isaac Chamberlain (1862-1937)

Collegiate Church Professor of Logic and Mental Philosophy (1905-1909)

 

Walter Taylor Marvin (1872-1944) Collegiate Church Professor of Logic and Mental Philosophy (1910-1944)

 

Thomas Munro (1897-1974)

Professor of Philosophy (1928-1931)

 

 

 

Hampden-Sydney College

 

 

Era

Faculty

1775-1820

College was founded in 1775 and began classes in that year.

 

Samuel Stanhope Smith (1751-1819)

President (1775-1779). Taught intellectual and moral philosophy and theology.

 

John Blair Smith (1756-1799)

President (1779-1789). Probably taught all classes from 1781 to 1784.

 

Drury Lacy (1758-1815)

Vice President (1788-1789), President (1789-1797). Taught intellectual and moral philosophy and theology.

 

Archibald Alexander (1772-1851) President (1797-1806). Taught intellectual and moral philosophy and theology.

 

Moses Hoge (1752-1820)

President and Professor of Theology (1807-1820). Taught mental and moral philosophy. Hoge was the founding professor of the Union Theological Seminary on the Hampden-Sidney campus. The Union Theological Seminary later moved to Richmond in 1898.

1820-1904

Presidents during this era taught Mental and Moral Philosophy, Evidences of Christianity, Logic, etc.

 

William Maxwell

President (1838-1845). Also was Professor of Moral Philosophy and Evidences of Christianity, Mental Philosophy, Civil Polity, Political Economy. Rhetoric, Logic, and Belles-Lettres.

 

John Mayo Pleasants Atkinson (1817-1883)

President (1857-1883). Taught Mental and Moral Philosophy, etc.

 

Richard McIlwaine (1834-1913)

President (1883-1904). Taught Mental and Moral Philosophy.

1905-

Stevenson Smith (1883-1950)

Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1906-1911)

 

Denison Maurice Allan (1896-1974)

Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1920-1968)

 

 

 

 

 

American colleges founded during the Revolutionary period (1776-1789)

 

Transylvania University (1780)

 

Washington College (Md.) (1782)

 

Washington and Lee University (1782)

 

Dickinson College (1783)

 

St. John's College (1784)

 

University of Georgia (1785)

 

Western University of Pennsylvania (now University of Pittsburgh) (1787)

 

Franklin College (1787, merged with Marshall College in 1850 to form Franklin and Marshall College)

 

Washington and Jefferson College (1787)

 

Georgetown University (1789)

 

University of North Carolina (1789)

 

 

 

Transylvania University

 

Era

Faculty

1780-1817

Classes began in 1785. Transylvania Seminary was a grammar school for its first two decades.

 

James Moore (c1755-1835)

First President and Professor of Logic, Metaphysics, Moral Philosophy, and Belles-Lettres (1791-1794, 1796-1804)

Robert Hamilton Bishop (1777-1855)

Professor of Philosophy (1804-1824)

 

In 1799 Transylvania Seminary was combined with Kentucky Academy, a Presbyterian school, and named Transylvania University.

1818-1858

 

 

Robert Hamilton Bishop (1777-1855)

Professor of Moral Philosophy, Logic, Criticism, and Belles-Lettres (1804-1818), Professor of History and Natural Philosophy (1818-1824)

Horace Holley (1781-1827)

President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, Philology, and Belles-Lettres (1818-1827)

Alva Woods (1794-1887)

President (1828-1831)

Benjamin Orr Peers (1800-1842)

Professor of Moral Philosophy (1827-1832), President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1832-1834)

Robert Davidson (1808-1876)

Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1838-1840), President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, Logic, Rhetoric, History, and Political Economy (1840-1842)

Henry Bidleman Bascom (1796-1850)

President and Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1842-1849)

 

The decline of the University through the 1850s into a teaching school ended college-level philosophical instruction.

1859-1899

Merged with Kentucky University in 1859.

Presidents of Kentucky University taught moral philosophy in accord with their denominational doctrines.

1900- 1940

Samuel Mitchell Jefferson (1849-1914)

Professor of Philosophy (1900-1914)

 

Renamed back to Transylvania University in 1908.

 

 

 

 

Washington and Lee University

 

Era

Faculty

1782-1834

Liberty Hall Academy (so named in 1776) became a college in 1782. In 1796 it was renamed Washington Academy, and in 1813 the name became Washington College. The college changed its name to Washington and Lee University in 1871.

 

William Graham (1745-1799)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1782-1796)

Samuel Legrande Campbell (? - ?)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1797-1799)

George Addison Baxter (1771-1841)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1799-1829)

Louis Marshall (1773-1866)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1830-1834)

1834-1907

Henry Vethake (1792-1866)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1834-1836)

Henry Ruffner (1790-1861)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1836-1848) George Junkin (1790-1868)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1848-1865)

John Lycan Kirkpatrick (1813-1885)

Professor of Moral Philosophy and Belles-Lettres (1866-1885)

James Addison Quarles (1837-1907)

Professor of Moral Philosophy and Belles-Lettres (1886-1907)

1907-

James Robert Howerton (1861-1924)

Professor of Philosophy and Bible Study (1907-1924)

 

 

 

 

University of Georgia

 

 

Era

Faculty

1785-1829

Incorporated in 1785; established in 1801.

 

Josiah Meigs (1757-1822) President and Professor of Philosophy (1800-1810)

John Brown (1763-1842) President and Professor of Philosophy (1811-1816)

Moses Waddel (1770-1840) President and Professor of Philosophy (1819-1829)

1829-1888

Alonzo Church (1793-1862) Professor of Mathematics (1819-1829), President (1829-1859) and also Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Political Economy (1842-1859)

Stephen Olin (1797-1851) Professor of Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy (1826-1828), Professor of Moral Philosophy and Belles-lettres (1831-1833)

Samuel P. Pressley (?-1836) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Belles-lettres (1833-1836)

Patrick Hues Mell (1814-1888) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1860-1888), also Chancellor (1878-1888)

1888-1905

William Ellison Boggs (1838-1920) Chancellor and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1888-1899)

Walter Barnard Hill (1851-1905) Chancellor and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1900-1905)

1905-1930s

Thomas Jackson Woofter (1862-1938) Professor of Philosophy and Education (1903-1938)

George Alexander Hutchinson (1876-1954) Professor of Philosophy and Educational Administration (1919-?)

Edgar Herbert Henderson (1896-1979) Professor of Philosophy (1926-1928)

William Hazer Wrighton (1884-1962) Professor of Philosophy (1930-1944)

 

 

 

Washington and Jefferson College

 

Era

Washington College

Jefferson College

1787-1865

Washington Academy was founded in Washington, Pennsylvania in 1787. It became Washington College by 1806. It merged with nearby Jefferson College in 1865. Philosophy was taught by the President.

 

Matthew Brown (1776-1853) President (1806-1811)

 

Andrew Wylie (1789-1851) President (1817-1828)

 

 

David Elliott (1787-1874) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1830-1831)

 

 

David McConaughy (1775-1852) President (1831-1849)

 

 

James Clark (1812-1892) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Languages(1850-1852)

 

James Irwin Brownson (1817-1899) President Pro Tem. (1852-1853)

 

John Work Scott (1807-1879) President (1852-1864)

Jefferson College was founded in 1802. Philosophy was usually taught by the President.

 

John Watson (1771-1802) President and Professor of Languages and Moral Philosophy (1802-1803)

James Dunlap (1744-1818) President and Professor of Languages and Moral Philosophy (1803-1811)

Andrew Wylie (1789-1851) President (1812-1816)

William McMillan (1777-1833) President (1817-1822)

Matthew Brown (1776-1853) President (1822-1845)

Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871) President (1845-1847)

Thomas Hanna Beveridge (1796-1873) Professor Extraordinary of Evidences of Natural and Revealed Religion (1846-1855)

Alexander Blaine Brown (1808-1863) President (1847-1856)

William Wallace (-1851) Professor Extraordinary of Moral Science (1850-1851)

Joseph Alden (1807-1885) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1857-1862)

David Hunter Riddle (1805-1888) President (1862-1865) and Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1862-1865)

1865-1881

David Hunter Riddle (1805-1888) Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1865-1868)

Jonathan Edwards (1817-1891) President and Professor of Philosophy and Natural Theology (1866-1869)

George Price Hays (1838-1897) President and Professor of Philosophy and Natural Theology (1870-1881)

George Fraser (?-?) Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1872-1875) 

 Jefferson College merged with Washington College in 1865.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1881-1920s

James David Moffat (1846-1916) President and Professor of Metaphysics, Political Philosophy and Evidences of Chistianity (1881-1915)

James Henry Snowden (1852-1936) Professor of Ethics and Political Economy (1893-1898)

Edward Moffat Weyer (1872-1964) Professor of Philosophy (1899-1948)

 

 

 

 

University of North Carolina

 

 

Era

Faculty

1789-1804

Chartered in 1789; classes began in 1795. Philosophical and theological instruction was sporadically given by early "presiding" professors.

1804-1835

Joseph Caldwell (1773-1835) First President and Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1804-1812, 1816-1835)

Robert Hett Chapman (1771-1833) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1812-1816)

1835-1870

William Hooper (1792-1876) Professor of Ancient Languages (1812-1822, 1828-1837), Professor of Rhetoric and Logic (1825-1828)

David Lowry Swain (1801-1868) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy, Metaphysics, Political Economy, and Law (1835-1868)

Charles Force Deems (1820-1893) Professor of Rhetoric and Logic (1842-1847)

John Thomas Wheat (1801-1888) Professor of Rhetoric and Logic (1850-1860)

1875-1920s

The university was closed from 1870 until 1875.

 

Adolphus Williamson Mangum (1834-1890) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, History, and English Literature (1875-1890)

Henry Horace Williams (1858-1940) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1891-1920), Kenan Professor of Philosophy (1920-1935)

 

 

 

 

American Colleges founded during the Early Republic period (1790-1820)

 

 

University of Vermont (1791)

 

Williams College (1793)

 

Bowdoin College (1794)

 

University of Tennessee (1794)

 

Union College (NY) (1795)

 

Middlebury College (1800)

 

In 1800 there were 25 degree-granting colleges in the US.

 

Jefferson College (1801)

 

South Carolina College (1801, now University of South Carolina)

 

Washington College (Penn.) (1802)

 

Ohio University (1804)

 

Moravian College (1807)

 

Miami University (1809)

 

Hamilton College (1812)

 

Colby College (1813)

 

Allegheny College (1815)

 

University of Virginia (1816)

 

 

 

 

University of Vermont

 

Era

Faculty

1791-1804

Philosophical and theological instruction was sporadically given by early presidents.

1826-1867

James Marsh (1794-1842) President (1826-1833), Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1833-1842)

Joseph Torrey (1797-1867) Professor of Greek and Latin (1827-1842), Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1842-1867), President (1862-1867)

1868-1902

Henry Augustus Pearson Torrey (1837-1902) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1868-1902)

1902-1920s

Carl Vernon Tower (1869- ) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1902-1909)

Asa Russell Gifford (1881-1964) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1909-1946)

 

 

 

Williams College

 

Era

Faculty

1793-1840s

Williams College was founded in 1793. Early presidents taught moral and intellectual philosophy.

 

Mark Hopkins (1802-1887) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Rhetoric (1830-1887). Fourth President of Williams (1836-1872).

Joseph Alden (1807-1885) Professor of Latin, English, Political Economy, and History (1835-1852)

1850s-1880

Mark Hopkins (1802-1887) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Rhetoric (1830-1887). President of Williams (1836-1872).

John Bascom (1827-1911) Tutor in Rhetoric and Oratory (1852-1854). Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1855-1874). Professor of Sociology and Political Science (1888-1903)

Edward Herrick Griffin (1843-1929) Professor of Latin (1872-1881), Professor of Rhetoric (1881-1886), Mark Hopkins Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1886-1889)

George Lansing Raymond (1839-1929) Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory (1874-1880).

1880-1905

Edward Herrick Griffin (1843-1929) Professor of Latin (1872-1881), Professor of Rhetoric (1881-1886), Mark Hopkins Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1886-1889)

John Bascom (1827-1911) Professor of Sociology and Political Science (1888-1903)

John Edward Russell (1848-1917) Mark Hopkins Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1889-1917).

Warner Fite (1867-1955) Professor of Philosophy (1894-1897).

1905-1920s

John Edward Russell (1848-1917) Mark Hopkins Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1889-1917).

James Bissett Pratt (1875-1944) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1917). Mark Hopkins Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1917-1943).

 

 

 

Bowdoin College

 

Era

Faculty

1794-1867

Bowdoin College was chartered in 1794 and opened in 1802 in Brunswick, Maine.

 

Joseph McKeen (1757-1807) President (1802-1807). Taught philosophical subjects.

Jesse Appleton (1772-1819) President (1807-1819). Taught philosophical subjects.

William Allen (1784-1868) President (1820-1839). Taught philosophical subjects. Thomas Cogswell Upham (1799-1872) Professor of Metaphysics and Ethics (1824-1867)

Samuel Phillips Newman (1797-1842) Professor of Civil Polity and Political Economy (1824-1839)

Leonard Woods, Jr. (1807-1878) President (1839-1866)

Charles Carroll Everett (1829-1900) Professor of Languages (1853-1857)

1867-1880s

Samuel Harris (1814-1899) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1867-1871)

Paul Ansel Chadbourne (1823-1883) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1871-1872)

Ephraim Chamberlain Cummings (1825-1897) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1873)

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1828-1914) President (1871-1883) and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1874-1883)

William DeWitt Hyde (1858-1917) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1886-1917)

George Trumbull Ladd (1842-1921) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1879-1881)

1886-1910s

William DeWitt Hyde (1858-1917) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1886-1917)

1910s-1930s

William DeWitt Hyde (1858-1917) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1886-1917)

Mortimer Phillips Mason (1876-1957) Professor of Philosophy (1920-1946)

Newton Phelps Stallnecht (1906-1981) Professor of Philosophy (1930-1949)

 

 

 

University of Tennessee

 

 

Era

Faculty

1794-1862

The University of Tennessee began as Blount College in Knoxville, chartered in 1794. It was renamed East Tennessee College in 1807, and then East Tennessee University in 1840, and finally the University of Tennessee in 1879.

Early Presidents occasionally taught philosophical subjects. The college was closed from 1809 to 1820.

1866-1890s

The college was closed from 1862 to 1866.

Thomas William Humes (1815-1892) President (1865-1883), Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1865-1873), Professor of Ethics and Evidences of Christianity (1873-1879), Professor of Philosophy, History, and Evidences of Christianity (1879-1883)

Richard Llewellyn Kirkpatrick (1817-1879) Professor of Latin (1869-1870), Professor of English Literature (1870-1873), Professor of English Literature and Mental Science (Logic) (1873-1878), Professor of Philosophy and History (1878-1879)

Thomas Connor Karns (1845-1911) Principal of Preparatory Department (1886-1889), Professor of English Languages and Literature and History (1889-?), Professor of Philosophy and History (?-1895), Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogics (1895-1899)

1886-1914

Burtis Burr Breese (1867-1939) Professor of Psychology and Ethics (1902-1904)

Robert Morris Ogden (1877-1959) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1905-1914)

1915-1930s

Axel Brett (1886-1950) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (?-?)

 

 

 

Union College

 

 

Era

Faculty

Union College was founded in Schenectady in upstate New York in 1795, the second college founded in New York after Columbia. By about 1830, Union was graduating as many students as any other college in America. Along with Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, it was spoken of as one of the "Big Four." By 1880 financial difficulties dramatically reduced Union's size and stature.

1795-1804

John Blair Smith (1756-1799)

President (1795-1799). Taught moral philosophy.

Jonathan Edwards, Jr. (1745-1801) President (1799-1801). Taught moral philosophy.

Jonathan Maxcy (1768-1820) President (1802-1804). Taught moral philosophy.

1804-1840s

Eliphalet Nott (1773-1866) President (1804-1866). Taught moral philosophy.

Alonzo Potter (1800-1865) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Political Economy (1832-1845)

1850s-1870s

Eliphalet Nott (1773-1866) President (1804-1866). Taught moral philosophy.

Laurens Perseus Hickok (1798-1888) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1853-1868). President (1866-1868).

1880s-1920s

Presidents often taught philosophy courses.

Frank Sargeant Hoffman (1852-1928) Professor of Philosophy (c.1890 to 1919).

 

 

 

University of South Carolina

 

Era

Faculty

1801-1820s

South Carolina College was founded in 1801. In 1906 it was renamed the University of South Carolina.

Jonathan Maxcy (1768-1820) President (1805-1820).

John Brown (1763-1842) Professor of Logic and Moral Philosophy (1809-1811)

B. R. Montgomery (1782-1823) Professor of Logic and Moral Philosophy (1811-18)

1820s-1840s

Robert Henry (1792-1856) Professor of Logic and Moral Philosophy (1818-1835), Professor of Metaphysics, Logic, and Belles-lettres (1839-1845). President (1842-1845).

Thomas Cooper (1759-1839) President (1821-34). Taught moral philosophy and political economy.

Henry Junius Nott (1797-1837) Professor of Elements of Criticism, Logic, and Philosophy of Language (1824-1834), Professor of Logic and Belles-lettres (1834-1837)

Francis Lieber (1800-1872) Professor of History and Political Economy (1835-1856)

James Henley Thornwell (1812-1862) Professor of Metaphysics (1837-1840), Professor of Theology (1841-1851)

1840s-1860s

Francis Lieber (1800-1872) Professor of History and Political Economy (1835-1856)

James Henley Thornwell (1812-1862) Professor of Metaphysics (1837-1840), Professor of Theology (1841-1851)

Maximillian La Borde (1804-1873) Professor of Logic and Belles-lettres (1842-1845), Professor of Metaphysics (1845-1865).

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (1790-1870) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1856-1861)

1865-1906

South Carolina College was the only southern state institution to admit and grant degrees to African American students during the Reconstruction era. When Reconstruction ended in 1877, the college was closed, and re-opened in 1880 as a whites-only agricultural college.

1906-1920s

The college was re-chartered as the University of South Carolina in 1906.

Josiah Morse (1879-1946) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1911-1946)

 

 

 

University of Virginia

 

Era

Faculty

1816-1845

Founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1816. Classes began in 1825.

George Tucker (1775-1861) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1825-1845)

1845-1873

William Holmes McGuffey (1800-1873) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1845-1873)

Albert Taylor Bledsoe (1809-1877) Professor of Mathematics (1854-1861)

George Frederick Holmes (1820-1897) Professor of History, Literature, and Political Economy (1857-1897)

1873-1920s

George Frederick Holmes (1820-1897) Professor of History, Literature, and Political Economy (1857-1897)

Noah Knowles Davis (1830-1910) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1873-1906)

Albert Lefevre (1873-1928) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1928?)

Albert George Adam Balz (1887-1957) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1957)

 

 

 

University of Alabama

 

 

Era

Faculty

1831-1865

The University of Alabama was founded in 1820. Classes began in 1831.

Alva Woods (1794-1887) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1831-1837)

Basil Manly (1798-1868) President and Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy (1837-1855)

Landon Cabell Garland (1810-1895) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1855-1865)

1871-1888

The university was closed from 1865 to 1871.

Telfair Hodgson (1840-1893) Professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics (1871-1872)

Joshua Hill Foster (1819-?) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1872-1874)

Carlos Green Smith (1813-1892) President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1874-1878)

From 1879 to 1888 various professors occupied the chair of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Political Science

1888-1920s

Thomas Chalmers McCorvey (1851-1932) Professor of History and Philosophy (1888-1923)

Edward Franklin Buchner (1868-1929) Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy (1903-1908)

Fletcher Bascom Dresslar (1859-1930) Professor of Philosophy and Education (1908-c.1912)

George Lang (1879-1971) Professor of Philosophy (1918-1949)

 

 

 

Indiana University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1820-1851

Indiana Seminary was founded in 1820. It was renamed Indiana College in 1828 and Indiana University in 1838.

Bayard Russ Hall (1798-1863) Professor of Theology (1823-1831)

Andrew Wylie (1789-1851) First President and Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy (1829-1851). Also taught Political Economy and Polite Literature.

1851-1884

From 1851 to 1884 the President continued to teach philosophical subjects.

Lemuel Moss (1829-1904) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1875-1884)

1885-1920

David Starr Jordan (1851-1931) President (1885-1891)

William Lowe Bryan (1860-1955) Professor of philosophy at Indiana University (1885-1902), Professor of Psychology (1893-1937), Vice President (1893-1902), President (1902-1937).

Lewis Clinton Carson (?-?) Professor of Philosophy (1903-1906)

Warner Fite (1867-1955) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1914)

William Kelley Wright (1877-1956) Instructor of Philosophy (1911-1912)

1921-1940

Daniel Sommer Robinson (1888-1977) Professor of Philosophy (1929-1939)

 

 

 

Amherst College

 

 

Era

Faculty

1821-1860s

Amherst College was founded in 1821.

Edward Hitchcock (1793-1864) Professor of chemistry and natural history (1825-1845). Professor of natural theology and geology (1845-1864). President of Amherst (1844-1854).

Henry Boynton Smith (1815-1877) Professor of moral philosophy and metaphysics (1847-1850)

1850s-1870s

Joseph Haven (1816-1874) Professor of mental and moral philosophy (1850-1858)

Julius Hawley Seelye (1824-1895) Professor of mental and moral philosophy (1858-1890), President of Amherst College (1876-1890)

1880-1907

Julius Hawley Seelye (1824-1895) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1858-1890), President of Amherst College (1876-1890)

Charles Edward Garman (1850-1907) Professor of philosophy (1880-1907)

1907-1920s

William Jesse Newlin (1878-1958) Professor of Philosophy (1907-1948)

Gail Kennedy (1900-1972) Professor of Philosophy (1926-1968)

Sterling Power Lamprecht (1890-1973) Professor of philosophy (1928-1956)

 

 

 

New York University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1831-1852

University of the City of New York was founded in 1831. It was renamed New York University in 1896.

 

Charles Pettit McIlvaine (1799-1873) Professor of Evidences of Revealed Religion (1831-1832)

Henry Philip Tappan (1805-1881) Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy and Belles-lettres (1832-1837)

John William Draper (1811-1882)

Professor of Chemistry (1837-1881), President (1850-1873)

Caleb Sprague Henry (1804-1884) Professor of History, Belles-lettres, and Philosophy (1838-1852)

Theodore Freylinghuysen (1787-1862)

President and Professor of Moral Philosophy (1839-1850)

1853-1898

Isaac Ferris (1798-1873)

Chancellor and Professor of Moral Philosophy and Evidences of Revealed Religion (1852-1870)

Benjamin Nicholas Martin (1816-1883) Professor of Psychology, Ethics, Logic, Rhetoric, History, and English Literature (1853-1883)

Henry Mitchell MacCracken (1840-1918) Professor of Philosophy (1884-1910) and President (1891-1910)

Addison Ballard (1822-1914) Professor of Logic (1893-1904)

Samuel Weir (1860-1943) Professor of History of Education and Ethics (1895-1901)

1899-1909

Henry Mitchell MacCracken (1840-1918) Professor of Philosophy (1884-1910) and President (1891-1910)

Addison Ballard (1822-1914) Professor of Logic (1893-1904)

Charles Gray Shaw (1871-1949) Professor of Philosophy (1899-1941)

1909-1920s

Charles Gray Shaw (1871-1949) Professor of Philosophy (1899-1941)

Herman Harrell Horne (1874-1946) Professor of History of Philosophy and Education (1909-1940)

William Curtis Swabey (1894-1979) Professor of Philosophy (1923-1956)

 

 

 

Wesleyan University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1831-1840s

Wesleyan University was founded as a Methodist institution in 1831 in Middletown, Connecticut.

Wilbur Fiske (1792-1839) President (1831-1839)

Stephen Henry Olin (1797-1851) President (1842-1851)

Daniel Denison Whedon (1808-1885) Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature (1833-1843)

1850s-1880s

Charles Kittridge True (1809-1878) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1849-1860)

Joseph Cummings (1817-1890) President (1857-1875). During his presidency he taught some philosophy. Professor of Mental Philosophy and Political Economy (1875-1877).

1880s-1920s

Andrew Campbell Armstrong (1860-1935) Professor of Philosophy (1888-1930)

 

 

 

Wake Forest University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1834-1862

Wake Forest was founded in 1834 by Baptists as "Wake Forest Manuel Labor Institute" in Wake Forest, North Carolina. Early presidents taught some philosophical subjects. In 1838 the name changed to Wake Forest College.

Samuel Wait (1789-1867) President (1834-1845)

William Hooper (1792-1876) President (1845-1848)

John Brown White (1810-1887) President (1849-1853)

Washington Manly Wingate (1828-1879) President and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Rhetoric (1853-1879)

1865-1890s

Operations were suspended from 1863 to 1865.

Washington Manly Wingate (1828-1879) President and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Rhetoric (1853-1879)

Thomas Henderson Pritchard (1832-1896) President and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1879-1882)

Charles Elisha Taylor (1842-1915) President (1884-1905), Professor of Moral Philosophy (1882-1915)

1900s-1920s

Charles Elisha Taylor (1842-1915) Professor of Moral Philosophy (1882-1915)

Albert Clayton Reid (1894-1988) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1920-1965)

By 1956 the college relocated to Winston-Salem, and was renamed Wake Forest University in 1967.

 

 

 

Emory University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1838-1861

Founded as Emory College by Georgia Methodist Conference in 1836 in Oxford, Georgia. Classes began in 1838.

Archelaus H. Mitchell (1807-1903) Professor of Mental Philosophy and Belles-lettres (1838-1839), Professor of Moral Science and English Literature (1840-1843)

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (1790-1870) President (1839-1848), Professor of Mental Philosophy, Political Economy, and Evidences of Christianity (1839-48), also Professor of Moral Philosophy (1844-1848)

George Foster Pierce (1811-1884) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, Political Economy, Evidences of Christianity, and English Literature (1848-1854)

Osborne L. Smith (1819-1878) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1850-1851), Professor of Intellectual Philosophy and Evidences of Christianity (1851-1852), Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1852-1854)

William Jacob Sasnett (1820-1865) Professor of Moral and Mental Science and English Literature (1855-1860)

James R. Thomas (1812-1897) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, Political Economy, and Evidences of Christianity (1855-1867)

1866-1898

Luther M. Smith (1826-1879) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science, Belles-lettres, and Evidences of Christianity (1868-1871)

Osborne L. Smith (1819-1878) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science and English Literature (1871-1875)

Atticus Green Haygood (1839-1896) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Biblical Literature (1875-1884)

Isaac Siles Hopkins (1841-1914) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1884-1888)

Warren Akin Candler (1857-1941) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Biblical Literature (1888-1898)

1898-1920s

The College was renamed Emory University in 1915 and moved to a new campus near Atlanta.

Charles Edward Dowman (1849-1914) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1898-1902)

James Edward Dickie (1864-1928) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1902-1915)

Rembert Gilman Smith (?-?) Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1903-1911)

Goodrich Cook White (1889-?) Professor of Mental and Moral Science (1914-1918)

Leroy Earl Loemker (1900-1985) Professor of Philosophy (1929-1969)

 

 

 

University of Michigan

 

 

Era

Faculty

1841-1869

Edward Thompson (?-?) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1843-1844)

Andrew Ten Brook (1814-?) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1844-1851)

Daniel Denison Whedon (1808-1885) Professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and Philosophy of History (1845-1851)

William Stanton Curtis (1815-1885) Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy (1851-1852)

Henry Philip Tappan (1805-1881) President and Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1852-1863)

Lucius Delison Chapin (1821-1892) Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1863-1867)

Erastus Otis Haven (1820-1881) President and Prof. Logic and Political Economy (1863-1869) and also Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy (1867-1869)

1869-1888

Benjamin Franklin Cocker (1821-1883) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1869-1881), Professor of Psychology, Speculative Philosophy, and History of Religion (1881-1883)

George Sylvester Morris (1840-1889) Professor of Modern Languages and Literature (1870-1880), Professor of Ethics, Logic, and History of Philosophy (1881-1885), Professor of Philosophy (1885-1889)

John Dewey (1859-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1884-1888, 1889-1894)

Williston Samuel Hough (1860-1912) Professor of Philosophy (1888-1889)

1889-1894

John Dewey (1859-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1884-1888, 1889-1894)

James Hayden Tufts (1862-1942 ) Professor of Philosophy (1889-1891)

George Herbert Mead (1863-1931) Professor of Philosophy (1891-1894)

Alfred Henry Lloyd (1864-1927) Professor of Philosophy (1891-1927)

1895-1910

Alfred Henry Lloyd (1864-1927) Professor of Philosophy (1891-1927)

Robert Mark Wenley (1861-1929) Professor of Philosophy (1896-1929)

Roy Wood Sellars (1880-1973) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1950)

1910-1920s

Alfred Henry Lloyd (1864-1927) Professor of Philosophy (1891-1927)

Robert Mark Wenley (1861-1929) Professor of Philosophy (1896-1929)

Roy Wood Sellars (1880-1973) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1950)

De Witt Henry Parker (1885-1949) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1949)

Brand Blanshard (1892-1987) Professor of Philosophy (1921-1925)

Andrew Paul Ushenko (1900-1956) Professor of Philosophy at Michigan (1929-1937)

 

 

 

University of Iowa

 

 

Era

Faculty

1847-1887

Instruction began in 1855.

Amos Dean (1803-1868) Chancellor (1855-1859). Never taught courses.

Jared M. Stone (1808-1876) Professor of Natural Philosophy (1856-1858). Also occasionally taught intellectual philosophy.

Silas Totten (1804-1873) President (1859-1862), Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Rhetoric (1859-1860), Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Belles-Lettres (1860-1862)

Oliver Spencer (1829-1895) President and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy, Belles-Lettres, and Political Economy (1862-1867)

James Black (1826-1890) President and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Belles-Lettres (1868-1870)

George Thacher (1817-1878) President and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and Belles-Lettres (1871-1877)

Stephen Norris Fellows (1830-1908) Professor of Didactics (1867-1873), Professor of Political and Moral Science and Didactics (1873-1878), Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Didactics (1878-1887)

1887-1930s

George Thomas White Patrick (1857-1949) Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Didactics (1887-1889), Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1889-1900), Professor of Philosophy (1900-1928)

Henry Waldgrave Stuart (1871-1951) Professor of Philosophy (1901-1904)

Edwin Diller Starbuck (1866-1947) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1930)

Feigl, Herbert (1902-1988) Professor of Philosophy (1931-1940)

 

 

 

University of Wisconsin

 

 

Era

Faculty

1848-1874

Daniel Read (1805-1878) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1856-1867)

Paul Ansel Chadbourne (1823-1883) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1867-1870)

Joseph H. Twombly (?-?) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1871-1874)

1874-1890s

John Bascom (1827-1911) President and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1874-1887)

Joseph Jastrow (1863-1944) Professor of Psychology (1888-1927)

Frank Chapman Sharp (1866-1943) Professor of Philosophy (1893-1936)

1900s-1920s

Joseph Jastrow (1863-1944) Professor of Psychology (1888-1927)

Frank Chapman Sharp (1866-1943) Professor of Philosophy (1893-1936)

Boyd Henry Bode (1873-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1900-1910)

Evander Bradley McGilvary (1864-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1905-1934)

Max Carl Otto (1876-1968) Professor of Philosophy (1907-1947)

Horace Meyer Kallen (1882-1974) Professor of Philosophy (1911-1918)

 

 

 

University of Minnesota

 

 

Era

Faculty

1851-1880

Gabriel Campbell (1838-1923) Professor of Philosophy (1867-1881)

1880-1889

Alexander Thomas Ormond (1847-1915) Professor of Philosophy (1880-1883)

Thomas Peebles (?-?) Professor of Philosophy (1883-1888)

John Dewey (1859-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1888-1889)

1889-1890s

Williston Samuel Hough (1860-1912) Professor of Philosophy (1889-1894)

Frederick James Eugene Woodbridge (1867-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1894-1902)

1900s-1920s

Norman Wilde (1867-1936) Professor of Philosophy (1898-1936)

David Ferdinand Swenson (1876-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1901-1940)

George Perrigo Conger (1884ñ1960) Professor of Philosophy (1920-1928)

 

 

 

Cornell University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1865-1892

Andrew Dickson White (1838-1923) President (1865-1879)

William Dexter Wilson (1816-1900) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1868-1886)

Jacob Gould Schurman (1854-1942) Professor of Philosophy (1885-1892), President (1892-1920)

1892-1920s

Jacob Gould Schurman (1854-1942) Professor of Philosophy (1885-1892), President (1892-1920)

James Edwin Creighton (1861-1924) Professor of Philosophy (1889-1924)

Edward Bradford Titchener (1867-1927) Professor of Psychology (1892-1927)

Ernest Albee (1865-1927) Professor of Philosophy (1892-1927)

William Alexander Hammond (1861-1938) Professor of Philosophy (1892-1930)

Evander Bradley McGilvary (1864-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1899-1905)

Frank Thilly (1865-1924) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1924)

William Kelley Wright (1877-1956) Professor of Philosophy (1913-1916)

1920s-1940s

Ernest Albee (1865-1927) Professor of Philosophy (1892-1927)

William Alexander Hammond (1861-1938) Professor of Philosophy (1892-1930)

Harold Robert Smart (1892-1979) Professor of Philosophy (1924-1960)

Gustavus Watts Cunningham (1881-1968) Professor of Philosophy (1927-1949)

George Holland Sabine (1880-1961) Professor of Philosophy (1931-1948)

Edwin Arthur Burtt (1892-1989) Professor of Philosophy (1932-1960)

 

 

 

University of Illinois

 

 

Era

Faculty

1867-1880s

Illinois Industrial University was founded in 1867, and was renamed University of Illinois in 1885.

The Department of Philosophy and Logic was established in 1871. In 1892 its name was changed to the Department of Philosophy. 

1890s-1910s

Arthur Hill Daniels (1865-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1893-1934)

Boyd Henry Bode (1873-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1921)

1920s-1930s

Sterling Power Lamprecht (1890-1973) Professor of Philosophy (1921-1928)

Matthew Thompson McClure, Jr. (1883-1964) Professor of Philosophy (1921-1951)

Abram Cornelius Benjamin (1897-1968) Professor of Philosophy (1923-1932)

Dilman Walter Gotshalk (1901-1973) Professor of Philosophy (1927-1965)

Glenn Raymond Morrow (1895-1973) Professor of Philosophy (1929-1939)

Guy Allan Tawney (1870-1947) Professor of Philosophy (1930-1939)

Frederick Ludwig Will (1909-1998) Professor of Philosophy (1938-1977)

Arthur Edward Murphy (1901-1962) Professor of Philosophy (1939-1945)

 

 

 

University of California

 

 

Era

Faculty

1868-1890s

Founded in 1868, the Berkley campus was opened in 1873. The Los Angeles southern branch (recognized in 1919) officially became a UC campus in 1927. The early Presidents occasionally gave instruction in philosophical subjects.

George Holmes Howison (1834-1916) Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1884-1916)

Evander Bradley McGilvary (1864-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1895-1899)

Ernest Carroll Moore (1871-1955) Professor of Philosophy and Education at UC Berkeley (1898-1906), President of UC Los Angeles (1917-1936), Professor of Philosophy and Education at UC Los Angeles (1936-1941)

William Pepperell Montague, Jr. (1873-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1899-1903)

1900s-1910s

George Holmes Howison (1834-1916) Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1884-1916)

Ernest Carroll Moore (1871-1955) Professor of Philosophy and Education at UC Berkeley (1898-1906), President of UC Los Angeles (1917-1936), Professor of Philosophy and Education at UC Los Angeles (1936-1941)

Harry Allen Overstreet (1875-1970) Professor of Philosophy (1901-1911)

Charles Henry Rieber (1866-1948) Professor of Philosophy at UC Berkeley (1903-1922), Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the College of Letters and Science at UC Los Angeles (1922-1936)

William Ernest Hocking (1873-1966) Professor of Philosophy (1906-1908)

George Plimpton Adams (1882-1961) Professor of Philosophy (1908-1932), Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1932-1954)

Clarence Irving Lewis (1883-1964) Professor of Philosophy (1911-1920)

Jacob Loewenberg (1882-1969) Professor of Philosophy (1915-1950)

1920s-1930s

George Plimpton Adams (1882-1961) Professor of Philosophy (1908-1932), Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1932-1954)

Jacob Loewenberg (1882-1969) Professor of Philosophy (1915-1950)

Stephen Coburn Pepper (1891-1972) Professor of Philosophy (1919-1954), Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1954-1958)

David Wight Prall (1886-1940) Professor of Philosophy (1921-1930)

William Ray Dennes (1898-1982) Professor of Philosophy (1923-1958), Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1958-1965)

Donald Sage Mackay (1892-1951) Professor of Philosophy at UC Los Angeles (1921-1927), Professor of Philosophy at UC Berkeley (1927-1951)

Paul Marhenke (1899-1952) Professor of Philosophy (1927-1952)

Charles William Strong (1901-1990) Professor of Philosophy (1932-1965), Chancellor (1961-1965), Mills Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity (1965-1967)

___________________________________________

University of California, Los Angeles

Ernest Carroll Moore (1871-1955) Professor of Philosophy and Education at UC Berkeley (1898-1906), President of UC Los Angeles (1917-1936), Professor of Philosophy and Education at UC Los Angeles (1936-1941)

Donald Sage Mackay (1892-1951) Professor of Philosophy at UC Los Angeles (1921-1927), Professor of Philosophy at UC Berkeley (1927-1951)

Charles Henry Rieber (1866-1948) Professor of Philosophy at UC Berkeley (1903-1922), Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the College of Letters and Science at UC Los Angeles (1922-1936)

Boodin, John Elof (1869-1950) Professor of Philosophy (1929-1939)

Donald Cary Williams (1899-1983) Professor of Philosophy (1930-1939)

Donald Ayres Piatt (1898-1967) Professor of Philosophy (1931-1965)

Hans Reichenbach (1891-1953) Professor of Philosophy (1938-1953)

 

 

 

Ohio State University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1870-1880s

The Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College was founded in 1870. Instruction began in 1873. It was renamed Ohio State University in 1878.

Walter Quincy Scott (1845-1917) President and Professor of Philosophy (1881-1883)

William Henry Scott (1840-1937) President and Professor of Philosophy (1883-1895), Professor of Philosophy (1895-1910)

1890s-1910s

William Henry Scott (1840-1937) President and Professor of Philosophy (1883-1895), Professor of Philosophy (1895-1910)

Arthur Ernest Davies (1867-1954) Instructor of Philosophy (1900-1906), Assistant Professor of Philosophy (1906-1908), Professor of Philosophy (1908-1919)

Joseph Alexander Leighton (1870-1954) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1941)

1920s-1930s

Joseph Alexander Leighton (1870-1954) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1941)

Daniel Luther Evans (1895-1979) Professor of Philosophy (1922-1925, 1938-1965)

George Holland Sabine (1880-1961) Professor of Philosophy (1923-1931)

Everett Wesley Hall (1901-1960) Professor of Philosophy (1931-1933)

 

 

 

Vanderbilt University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1873-1890

Vanderbilt University was founded by Methodists in Nashville in 1873.

John Cowper Granbery (1829-1907) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy and Practical Theology (1875-1882)

Andrew Adgate Lipscomb (1816-1890) Professor of Philosophy and Criticism (1875-1880), then occasionally taught as visiting professor emeritus until 1884.

John James Tigert (1856-1906) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1886-1890)

1890-1930s

Collins Denny (1854-1943) Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy (1890-1910)

Herbert Charles Sanborn (1873-1967) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1911-1942)

 

 

 

Johns Hopkins University

 

 

Era

Faculty

1875-1890s

Johns Hopkins University was founded by in Baltimore in 1876.

Charles DíUrban Morris (1827-1886) Professor of Greek (1876-1886). Taught Aristotle.

 

During 1877-1879, visiting lecturers occasionally taught philosophy: George S. Morris, William James, and C. S. Peirce.

 

Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) Professor of Logic (1879-1884)

George Sylvester Morris (1840-1889) Professor of Philosophy (1880-1885)

Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) Professor of Psychology (1882-1888)

Edward Herrick Griffin (1843-1929) Professor of the History of Philosophy and Dean of the College Faculty (1889-1915)

1890s-1910s

Edward Herrick Griffin (1843-1929) Professor of the History of Philosophy and Dean of the College Faculty (1889-1915)

James Mark Baldwin (1863-1934) Professor of Philosophy and Psychology (1903-1909)

Christine Ladd-Franklin (1847-1930) Lecturer in Psychology and Logic (1905-1909)

Edward Franklin Buchner (1868-1929) Professor of Education and Philosophy (1908-1915), Professor of Education (1915-1929)

Arthur Oncken Lovejoy (1873-1963) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1938)

1920s-1930s

Arthur Oncken Lovejoy (1873-1963) Professor of Philosophy (1910-1938)

George Boas (1891-1980) Professor of Philosophy (1921-1957)

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